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v2.11

Minor Versionm

by Tanya Taylor

Introduction

A leak can be caused by loose connections, worn seals (o-rings) or split tubing.

If a leak occurs, this can affect the flow rate which will have a big impact on the accuracy of the measurement.

To understand how often you should perform this service activity, click here.

Tools

No tools specified.

Parts

  1. Enter service mode so any fluctuations in the data caused from this activity can be excluded from air quality reports.
    • Enter service mode so any fluctuations in the data caused from this activity can be excluded from air quality reports.

  2. Adjust the sample flow by pulling the adjustment knob outwards, turning the knob to increase/decrease flow, and pushing the knob back in to lock when desired flow has been reached. Fully open the sample flow adjustment valve, which is located on the face plate of the pump module. On older monitors, the sample flow adjustment valve is positioned at the bottom of the enclosure under the PDI cover.
    • Adjust the sample flow by pulling the adjustment knob outwards, turning the knob to increase/decrease flow, and pushing the knob back in to lock when desired flow has been reached.

    • Fully open the sample flow adjustment valve, which is located on the face plate of the pump module.

    • On older monitors, the sample flow adjustment valve is positioned at the bottom of the enclosure under the PDI cover.

    • Block the purge flow by pinching the purge tube.

    • On older monitors, block the purge flow by disconnecting the purge line and capping the purge line and ports with luer caps.

  3. Remove the TSP inlet and place the vacuum gauge on the inlet.
    • Remove the TSP inlet and place the vacuum gauge on the inlet.

    • Wait for the gauge to stabilise.

    • The gauge should reach at least -60 kPa while power is connected.

  4. Stop the sample pump by pulling out the black and red power cable from the electronics module. Count how long it takes for the pressure to change by 10 kPa.
    • Stop the sample pump by pulling out the black and red power cable from the electronics module.

    • Count how long it takes for the pressure to change by 10 kPa.

    • If the pressure change (leak rate) is greater than 10 kPa in 10 seconds, you'll need to check for loose connections, worn seals (o-rings) or split tubing.

    • For example, if the needle moves from -70 kPa to -60 kPa in 20 seconds, this is OK, but if if moves from -70 kPa to -60 Kpa in 8 seconds, this indicates a leak.

Conclusion

For further support, contact Technical Support.

Tanya Taylor

Member since: 02/25/2020

135 Guides authored

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